General Tips for Successful Cell Culture


Posted by Dan D on Apr 24, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Culturing cells in the lab? Following these tips will add to your success and help you avoid wasted time or the dreaded cell contamination!

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Topics: techniques, Science Education, Tech Tips

STR Profiling: What's growing in your incubator?


Posted by Hayley R. on Mar 6, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Cell lines are a crucial part of life science research and development. But did you know an estimated 18-36% of cell lines are believed to be misidentified or cross-contaminated with another cell line?

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Topics: techniques, Reproducibility

Can I accelerate my ELISA results?


Posted by Chris S on Jan 16, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Running an ELISA can be a pain. Identifying pairs for an ELISA is a tedious business, and that’s before developing and validating the ELISA assay itself. Using a kit can simplify the process, but at what cost? Will that kit hinder reproducibility by introducing lot-to-lot variability over the course of my project’s lifetime? Many kits still require numerous reagent addition, incubation, and wash steps that add hands-on time and complexity to your assay.

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Topics: ELISA, techniques

When should I use flow cytometry for signaling instead of western blot?


Posted by Chris S on Jan 9, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Flow cytometry enables quantitative analysis of protein expression, signaling states, and physical characteristics (cell size/granularity) at the single-cell level. Modern flow cytometers are capable of collecting data on multiple proteins from thousands of cells per second in a heterogeneous mixture. While flow cytometry is commonly employed to identify cell types using phenotypic markers expressed on the cell surface, it can also be used to measure intracellular signaling events.

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Topics: Flow, techniques

Mycoplasma Contamination!


Posted by Michelle G on Dec 5, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Any form of cell culture contamination can ruin your day and destroy your hard work, but mycoplasma contamination is particularly devastating.

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Topics: techniques, Science Education

Writing a Grant Part 4: Additional Details


Posted by Tamar A. on Nov 7, 2018 3:10:00 AM

Finally, the finish line is approaching! You have completed your specific aims, significance and innovation, and the bulk of your research strategy. You have sent those files for numerous rounds of pre-peer review by your trusted colleagues and mentors. Now it’s time to focus on some smaller, yet still very important details.

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Topics: techniques, Career Development, Science Education

Writing a Grant Part 3: The Experimental Approach


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 31, 2018 3:10:00 AM

In the previous post, we described how to write an effective significance and innovation section, focused on defining the problem and providing a high-level overview of your proposed solution. In this post, we’ll outline the approach, wherein you’ll expand upon the solution and illustrate exactly how you plan to conduct the research.

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Topics: techniques, Science Education

Writing a Grant Part 2: Significance and Innovation


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 24, 2018 7:43:37 AM

The significance and innovation section is a recent (within the last 10 years) addition to the NIH and most other foundation grant applications. It is a place for you to showcase WHY the work should be done – WHY there is a significant need for your study, and HOW the work is different from everyone else’s approach. What makes it groundbreaking, original research, work that will advance our scientific knowledge?

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Topics: techniques, Science Education

Writing a Grant Part 1: First Things First


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 17, 2018 3:15:00 AM

So you’re thinking of writing a grant? Or maybe your mentor has politely suggested that it would be in your best interest to do so?

Where do you start?

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Topics: techniques, Career Development, Science Education

Demystifying Multiplex IHC


Posted by Jen Z on Oct 10, 2018 3:15:00 AM

In recent years, immune checkpoint proteins in the tumor microenvironment have been under intense study. If you work in the immuno-oncology field, chances are you are either performing multiplex IHC (mIHC) or would like to. Ultimately, a multiplexed image like the one featured here provides a multi-layered depiction of a tumor, such that each antibody corresponds to a different fluorescent signal. If you want to detect more targets in your IHC, but aren’t sure how to design a panel of antibodies and fluorophores for mIHC, we’ll walk you through the process in this post.

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Topics: IHC, Cancer Research, mIHC, techniques, Immunology

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