Cell Process: What is cell senescence?


Posted by Tamar A. on Aug 12, 2020 3:00:00 AM

Cellular senescence is a state of stable cell cycle arrest under which cells remain metabolically active, but no longer divide and do not respond to growth-promoting stimuli. Senescence is triggered by a variety of cellular stressors. These include environmental factors like ionizing radiation or exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, oxidative stress, DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oncogene activation. This process provides a defense mechanism to maintain tissue homeostasis through the sequestration of damaged cells. Senescent cells influence a number of physiological and pathological processes from cancer to diabetes and aging. Accordingly, understanding why senescence contributes to these conditions may lead to the development of pro- and anti-senescence therapies to treat a range of diseases.

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Topics: Cell Biology

How can recombinant proteins help researchers study SARS-CoV-2?


Posted by Tamar A. on Aug 5, 2020 3:15:00 AM

Although coronaviruses have long circulated throughout human populations, the study of these viruses has intensified over the last two decades, due to the rise of novel coronaviruses that have greatly impacted human health. The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012, and the recent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in 2019, has emphasized the importance of understanding the fundamental mechanisms by which these viruses cause disease.

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Topics: Immunology

Cell Process: How is cytotoxicity assessed?


Posted by Tamar A. on Jul 8, 2020 3:00:00 AM

Changes in cellular health in response to exogenous stimuli can provide keen insight into the biological mechanisms that govern the relationship between cells and their environment and can dramatically influence the interpretation of experimental results. These reasons underscore why it is important to understand cytotoxicity and to employ assays to measure its impact.

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Topics: Cell Biology

Cell Process: The seven best assays to detect apoptosis


Posted by Tamar A. on Jul 1, 2020 3:00:00 AM

Apoptosis is a highly regulated form of programmed cell death that occurs in multicellular organisms during development, throughout the lifespan, and in response to cellular stress. Nuclear condensation, cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, and DNA fragmentation are characteristic features of the cellular disassembly that occurs during this form of cell death. A family of proteolytic enzymes, called caspases, serves as the central regulators of apoptosis, and their activity, in turn, is balanced by myriad additional pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins. The dysregulation of apoptosis occurs in and contributes to the pathology of several disease states, including autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, understanding how and why apoptosis influences these biological processes may lead to advances in therapies to treat and benefit human health.

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Topics: Cell Biology

Immunology: What are toll-like receptors and how do they invoke tumor tolerance?


Posted by Tamar A. on Jun 10, 2020 3:00:00 AM

Toll-like receptors (TLR) are transmembrane receptors that play a critical role in innate immune responses. The name derives from the homology to the Drosophila Toll gene; unlike adaptive immunity which evolved in the vertebrate lineage, innate immunity exists (and is conserved) in invertebrate branches.

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Topics: Immunology

Immunology: Can we re-train our T cells to attack cancer?


Posted by Tamar A. on Jun 3, 2020 3:00:00 AM

The human immune system comprises an array of ingenious cellular components and mechanisms that collectively protect us from harmful exogenous pathogens. Harnessing this power to attack and treat cancer is an intense area of research. Understanding why cancer cells normally evade immune surveillance and developing strategies to help the immune system distinguish between tumor cells and healthy tissue may lead to the development of highly efficacious therapies for those afflicted with cancer.

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Topics: Immunology

Immunology: What cells have a myeloid lineage and how are they identified?


Posted by Tamar A. on May 27, 2020 3:00:00 AM

During haematopoiesis in humans, cells of the myeloid lineage are derived from a common myeloid progenitor (CMP) in the bone marrow. This lineage — which includes monocytes, granulocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets — is a primary component of the innate immune system and serves as a first line of defense against infection.

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Topics: Immunology

9B11 Is a Superior Clone against Top-cited Myc-tag Competitor


Posted by Tamar A. on May 20, 2020 3:15:00 AM

Biological research is about expanding knowledge, so it's not uncommon for scientists to become interested in studying proteins for which antibodies have not yet been developed. How then, can scientists pursue mechanistic studies of these novel or less-characterized proteins? Epitope tagging is a powerful tool for these protein studies and is used in myriad experimental applications. However, care must be taken not only in choice of epitope tag, but in selection and validation of antibodies.

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Topics: Antibody Performance

10 Must-have Markers for Senescence Research


Posted by Tamar A. on May 13, 2020 3:00:00 AM

Interested in studying senescence? Understanding when and why cell cycle arrest occurs is critical to many fields of research, including (but not limited to) studies of development, aging, and cancer. We all know the best tools produce the best results, so make sure you have all your bases covered with this list of the top 10 targets for your senescence research!

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Cell Process - How is cell proliferation quantified?


Posted by Tamar A. on Apr 22, 2020 3:00:00 AM

The production of new cells through cellular proliferation impacts the development, growth, and maintenance of all tissues in the body. This process must be tightly regulated, since uncontrolled cell division – as seen in various cancers – can lead to tumor formation and disrupt organ function. These broad implications for biological activities highlight the importance of understanding and accurately measuring cellular proliferation in a variety of contexts.

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Topics: Cell Biology

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