Demystifying Multiplex IHC


Posted by Jen Z on Oct 10, 2018 3:15:00 AM

In recent years, immune checkpoint proteins in the tumor microenvironment have been under intense study. If you work in the immuno-oncology field, chances are you are either performing multiplex IHC (mIHC) or would like to. Ultimately, a multiplexed image like the one featured here provides a multi-layered depiction of a tumor, such that each antibody corresponds to a different fluorescent signal. If you want to detect more targets in your IHC, but aren’t sure how to design a panel of antibodies and fluorophores for mIHC, we’ll walk you through the process in this post.

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Topics: Immunology, IHC, mIHC, Cancer Research, techniques

Video: Understanding Macrophages in the Tumor Microenvironment


Posted by Ken B on Sep 19, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Research trends in macrophage plasticity

It’s an exciting time for immuno-oncology research, as potential predictive biomarkers from an expanding collection of cell types are being pursued. Explore the plasticity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and challenges in distinguishing M1- versus M2- functional states in this 5-minute video featuring CST Developmental Scientist Sarah Klein, PhD. 

Can't see the embedded video? Click here to watch.

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Topics: Immunotherapy, Immunology, Cancer Research

Targeting B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Holds Promise for Multiple Myeloma Cure


Posted by Amrik S. on Aug 8, 2018 3:10:00 AM

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a type of hematopoietic malignancy characterized, in part, by bone pain, anemia, kidney failure, and recurring infections. The underlying mechanism that drives the disease is abnormal proliferation and accumulation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow that secrete large amounts of abnormal antibodies.

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Topics: Immunotherapy, Therapeutics, Immunology

Reflecting on the New Year with Janus and Jak


Posted by Ken B on Jan 3, 2018 3:00:00 AM

With the arrival of the New Year, we all look back on 2017 and anticipate the coming year. CST scientists have been working hard to develop new antibodies and reagents to enable your next successful experiment in 2018!

In Roman mythology, the New Year and the month of January are associated with Janus, the god of transitions and doorways (1). Janus is best known for having two faces: one looking to the past, and one to the future. Janus also lends his name to the Janus kinase (Jak) family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases.

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Topics: Immunology, Just for fun

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