What is Senescence?


Posted by Susan K on May 22, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Cellular senescence is defined by permanent cell cycle arrest. Senescent cells accumulate with age and contribute to the normal aging process as well as age-related disorders. The link between senescence, aging, and age-related pathologies, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and metabolic and cardiovascular diseases have largely fueled the senescence research field.

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Topics: Cell Biology

Hallmarks of Cancer: Evading Growth Suppressors


Posted by Chris S on May 1, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Cancer cells resist inhibitory signals that might otherwise stop their growth. The major pathways involved are Autophagy and Death Receptor Signaling (Apoptosis), both of which can ultimately lead to cell death, and reduction in tumor growth.

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Topics: Cell Biology, Cancer Research

Hallmarks of Cancer: Enabling Replicative Immortality


Posted by Chris S on Apr 17, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Cancer cells can revert to a pre-differentiated, stem-cell-like phenotype, allowing uninhibited cellular division and other metabolic adaptations that enable survival in adverse conditions.

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Topics: Cell Biology, Cancer Research

Hallmarks of Cancer: Sustaining Proliferative Signaling


Posted by Chris S on Apr 3, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Cancer cells stimulate their own growth, which means they become self-sufficient in growth signals, and no longer depend on external signals (like Epidermal Growth Factor EGF/ EGFR). Proliferation depends highly on these three important pathways: Akt, MAPK/Erk, and MTOR.

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Topics: Cell Biology, Cancer Research

Hypoxia and Cancer – the role of HIF-1α in oxygen sensing, metabolism, and tumorigenesis


Posted by Jianxin X. on Mar 27, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Molecular oxygen (O2) is an essential element for metazoan life. Among its many roles, O2 functions as the final electron acceptor (oxidizing agent) during oxidative phosphorylation, a metabolic chain-reaction that generates energy in the form of ATP.

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Topics: Metabolism, Cell Biology

Hallmarks of Cancer: Inducing Angiogenesis Energetics


Posted by Chris S on Mar 20, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Cancer cells stimulate the growth of blood vessels to supply nutrients to tumors. Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing blood vessels. This plays an important role in tumor growth.

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Topics: Cell Biology, Cancer Research

Necroptosis and Pyroptosis Add to Our Understanding of Apoptotic Cell Death


Posted by Gary K. on Mar 13, 2019 3:05:00 AM

Over the last 50 years laboratories have been able to demonstrate through experimentation the processes contributing to cell death. Early discoveries focused on morphological features of cell death and classifications into apoptosis and necrosis. Since then, there have been many more discoveries regarding the programmed cellular pathways contributing to apoptosis.

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Topics: Cell Biology

Hallmarks of Cancer: Deregulating Cellular Energetics


Posted by Chris S on Feb 27, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Cancer cells need a lot of energy to grow fast—to do so, they show abnormal metabolic pathways.

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Topics: Cell Biology, Cancer Research

Missing Link: Why Do Insulin-producing Cells in Type 2 Diabetes Fail to Divide?


Posted by Neha G on Jan 17, 2018 3:00:00 AM

Type 2 diabetes is a growing epidemic, and is recognized as one of the most serious metabolic disease worldwide. A multifactorial disease, type 2 diabetes is a perfect example of metabolic miscommunication between different organs resulting in a pathological outcome. According to CDC in the United States, 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million may be undiagnosed. The disease affects more than 1 in every 10 adults, and seniors aged 65 and above are most affected. What makes the disease morbid are the secondary complications associated with it; atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy are the leading cause of death in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The need for an effective treatment has become a global health priority.

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Topics: Metabolism, Cell Biology, Journal Club

Webinar | Advances in AMPK and Autophagy Signaling


Posted by Liana G on Dec 20, 2017 6:15:00 AM

Reuben Shaw, Ph.D

Professor, Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Deputy Director, Salk Cancer Center, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

AMPK, a highly conserved sensor of cellular energy status, is found in all eukaryotic cells and maintains metabolic homeostasis by reprogramming growth, metabolism, and autophagy in the face of cellular stresses.

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Topics: Metabolism, Cell Biology

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