Mycoplasma Contamination!


Posted by Michelle G on Dec 5, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Any form of cell culture contamination can ruin your day and destroy your hard work, but mycoplasma contamination is particularly devastating.

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Topics: Science Education, techniques

Tech Tips Video: How much antibody should I use for ChIP?


Posted by Ken B on Nov 28, 2018 3:15:00 AM

It's time to check out another video from the CST Tech Tips playlist! In this edition of Tech Tips, we'll tackle a common protocol question customers ask our ChIP team: how much antibody to use for chromatin immunoprecipitaion (ChIP) experiments. Adding more antibody isn't always better - watch the video to learn why. 

Can't see the embedded video above? Click the link below to play: 

How much antibody should I use in ChIP assays? | CST Tech Tips
 

Don't forget to subscribe to CST's YouTube channel for more videos to help your research!

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Topics: ChIP, Tech Tips, Protocols, Primary Antibodies

Webinar | Deciphering Neurodegeneration: Inflammation, immune response, and Alzheimer's


Posted by Chris S on Nov 14, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Hear about the potential role of innate immunity in neurodegeneration and cognitive function, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. Learn how immune-related pathways regulate the development, refinement, and elimination of specific axons and synapses during development. Gain an understanding of how recent work can provide insight into protecting synapses in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders of synaptic dysfunction.

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Topics: Webinars

Writing a Grant Part 4: Additional Details


Posted by Tamar A. on Nov 7, 2018 3:10:00 AM

Finally, the finish line is approaching! You have completed your specific aims, significance and innovation, and the bulk of your research strategy. You have sent those files for numerous rounds of pre-peer review by your trusted colleagues and mentors. Now it’s time to focus on some smaller, yet still very important details.

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Topics: Science Education, Career Development, techniques

Writing a Grant Part 3: The Experimental Approach


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 31, 2018 3:10:00 AM

In the previous post, we described how to write an effective significance and innovation section, focused on defining the problem and providing a high-level overview of your proposed solution. In this post, we’ll outline the approach, wherein you’ll expand upon the solution and illustrate exactly how you plan to conduct the research.

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Topics: Science Education, techniques

Writing a Grant Part 2: Significance and Innovation


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 24, 2018 7:43:37 AM

The significance and innovation section is a recent (within the last 10 years) addition to the NIH and most other foundation grant applications. It is a place for you to showcase WHY the work should be done – WHY there is a significant need for your study, and HOW the work is different from everyone else’s approach. What makes it groundbreaking, original research, work that will advance our scientific knowledge?

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Topics: Science Education, techniques

Writing a Grant Part 1: First Things First


Posted by Tamar A. on Oct 17, 2018 3:15:00 AM

So you’re thinking of writing a grant? Or maybe your mentor has politely suggested that it would be in your best interest to do so?

Where do you start?

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Topics: techniques, Career Development, Science Education

Demystifying Multiplex IHC


Posted by Jen Z on Oct 10, 2018 3:15:00 AM

In recent years, immune checkpoint proteins in the tumor microenvironment have been under intense study. If you work in the immuno-oncology field, chances are you are either performing multiplex IHC (mIHC) or would like to. Ultimately, a multiplexed image like the one featured here provides a multi-layered depiction of a tumor, such that each antibody corresponds to a different fluorescent signal. If you want to detect more targets in your IHC, but aren’t sure how to design a panel of antibodies and fluorophores for mIHC, we’ll walk you through the process in this post.

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Topics: Immunology, IHC, mIHC, Cancer Research, techniques

2018 Nobel Prize Awarded to Immunotherapy Pioneers


Posted by Cell Signaling Technology on Oct 3, 2018 3:00:00 AM

Earlier this week, Dr. James Allison and Dr. Tasuku Honjo were announced as joint winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work in the field of immunotherapy and checkpoint immune regulation. Their studies have sparked decades of clinical advances, and changed the future of cancer therapy. A webinar presented by Dr. Allison in conjunction with Dr. Gordon Freeman and Dr. Philip Gotwals is featured in this week's blog post.

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Topics: Immunotherapy, Cancer Research, Cancer Immunology, Webinars

Myth-busting for ChIP/ChIP-seq: Mono vs. Poly


Posted by Neha G and Ken B on Sep 26, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Researchers who run a lot of chromatin immunoprecipitation "ChIP" assays – maybe even your advisor – might subscribe to the idea that polyclonal antibodies perform better than monoclonal antibodies. But is that always actually true?

It’s worth your time to understand the differences between the two in terms of antigen recognition and specificity, and dispel some myths. 

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Topics: ChIP, Antibody Performance, Antibody Validation, Reproducibility, Post Translational Modification

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