More Than a Phenotype: a Guide to Assessing Tumor-infiltrating Immune Cell Types and Functions


Posted by Emily A. on Feb 6, 2019 3:05:00 AM

Although the rise of cancer immunotherapy may seem meteoric to many, the history goes back over 100 years to William B. Coley, often referred to as the father of immunotherapy. 

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Topics: Immunology

What makes an antibody monoclonal, polyclonal, or recombinant?


Posted by Anthony C on Jan 30, 2019 3:10:00 AM

When you’re shopping for antibodies, there are so many factors to consider. For example, will it work in my cell or tissue model? Has it been tested in the application I want to use? Sometimes it’s a struggle to find what you need because your options are limited, but in other instances there may be several reagents that seem like they could work in your experiment.

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Topics: Antibody Performance, Primary Antibodies, Antibody Validation

Hallmarks of Cancer: Resisting Cell Death


Posted by Chris S on Jan 23, 2019 3:15:00 AM

One thing we know about cancer cells: they can resist death. They evade apoptosis, the mechanism that programs cell death once cells become damaged. Normally, apoptosis helps keep an organism healthy through growth and development, maintaining body tissue by removing infected or damaged cells. But cancer cells do not follow this process, no matter how abnormally they grow.

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Topics: Cancer Research

Can I accelerate my ELISA results?


Posted by Chris S on Jan 16, 2019 3:10:00 AM

Running an ELISA can be a pain. Identifying pairs for an ELISA is a tedious business, and that’s before developing and validating the ELISA assay itself. Using a kit can simplify the process, but at what cost? Will that kit hinder reproducibility by introducing lot-to-lot variability over the course of my project’s lifetime? Many kits still require numerous reagent addition, incubation, and wash steps that add hands-on time and complexity to your assay.

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Topics: ELISA, techniques

When should I use flow cytometry for signaling instead of western blot?


Posted by Chris S on Jan 9, 2019 3:15:00 AM

Flow cytometry enables quantitative analysis of protein expression, signaling states, and physical characteristics (cell size/granularity) at the single-cell level. Modern flow cytometers are capable of collecting data on multiple proteins from thousands of cells per second in a heterogeneous mixture. While flow cytometry is commonly employed to identify cell types using phenotypic markers expressed on the cell surface, it can also be used to measure intracellular signaling events.

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Topics: Flow, techniques

Reflecting on the New Year with Janus and Jak


Posted by Ken B on Jan 2, 2019 10:45:49 AM

In Roman mythology, the New Year and the month of January are associated with Janus, the god of transitions and doorways (1). Janus is best known for having two faces: one looking to the past, and one to the future. Janus also lends his name to the Janus kinase (Jak) family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases.

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Topics: Just for fun, Immunology

Mycoplasma Contamination!


Posted by Michelle G on Dec 5, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Any form of cell culture contamination can ruin your day and destroy your hard work, but mycoplasma contamination is particularly devastating.

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Topics: techniques, Science Education

Tech Tips Video: How much antibody should I use for ChIP?


Posted by Ken B on Nov 28, 2018 3:15:00 AM

It's time to check out another video from the CST Tech Tips playlist! In this edition of Tech Tips, we'll tackle a common protocol question customers ask our ChIP team: how much antibody to use for chromatin immunoprecipitaion (ChIP) experiments. Adding more antibody isn't always better - watch the video to learn why. 

Can't see the embedded video above? Click the link below to play: 

How much antibody should I use in ChIP assays? | CST Tech Tips
 

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Topics: Protocols, Primary Antibodies, ChIP, Tech Tips

Webinar | Deciphering Neurodegeneration: Inflammation, immune response, and Alzheimer's


Posted by Chris S on Nov 14, 2018 3:15:00 AM

Hear about the potential role of innate immunity in neurodegeneration and cognitive function, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. Learn how immune-related pathways regulate the development, refinement, and elimination of specific axons and synapses during development. Gain an understanding of how recent work can provide insight into protecting synapses in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders of synaptic dysfunction.

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Topics: Webinars

Writing a Grant Part 4: Additional Details


Posted by Tamar A. on Nov 7, 2018 3:10:00 AM

Finally, the finish line is approaching! You have completed your specific aims, significance and innovation, and the bulk of your research strategy. You have sent those files for numerous rounds of pre-peer review by your trusted colleagues and mentors. Now it’s time to focus on some smaller, yet still very important details.

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Topics: techniques, Career Development, Science Education

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