Antibody Company of the Year (2018)


Posted by Chris S on Feb 7, 2018 6:15:00 AM

We as scientists learn from each success and failure. Sometimes it takes many failures to achieve success. And some discoveries are made with no fanfare, far from the spotlight. Other times, a good day’s work is even sweeter when you realize someone noticed!

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Topics: Antibody Performance, Antibody Validation, Cancer Research, Reproducility

Keep ChIP’ing away.


Posted by Curtis D on Jan 31, 2018 6:00:00 AM

So your experiments and data are funneling you down an inescapable path. You need to show direct gene regulation by your protein of interest. You think to yourself, “Oh, ChIP...”

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Topics: Protocols, Antibody Performance, ChIP, techniques, Reproducility

Characterize Myeloid Cell Mediated Immunosuppression in the Tumor Microenvironment Using Multiplex IHC


Posted by Neha G on Jan 24, 2018 3:00:00 AM

The clinical validation of immune checkpoint inhibitors as immunotherapeutic agents for a variety of cancers has revolutionized the field of cancer therapy. While significant improvement in patient outcome has been observed with previously untreatable tumors, not all patients respond to these drugs (1). An advanced understanding of the immune regulatory context of the tumor microenvironment (TME) is required to harness the power of the antitumor immune response. This will allow identification of novel therapeutic targets and potential biomarkers that can predict response to therapy (2, 3). 

Our mIHC application notes and poster resources explore the protocol and technical considerations for selecting and using antibodies in mIHC to assess immunosuppression mediated by myeloid cells in FFPE tissue samples.

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Missing Link: Why Do Insulin-producing Cells in Type 2 Diabetes Fail to Divide?


Posted by Neha G on Jan 17, 2018 3:00:00 AM

Type 2 diabetes is a growing epidemic, and is recognized as one of the most serious metabolic disease worldwide. A multifactorial disease, type 2 diabetes is a perfect example of metabolic miscommunication between different organs resulting in a pathological outcome. According to CDC in the United States, 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million may be undiagnosed. The disease affects more than 1 in every 10 adults, and seniors aged 65 and above are most affected. What makes the disease morbid are the secondary complications associated with it; atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy are the leading cause of death in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The need for an effective treatment has become a global health priority.

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Topics: Metabolism, Cell Biology, Journal Club

Webinar | Achieving Reproducibility: Don't Let Antibodies Be a Variable in Your Experiment


Posted by Chris S on Jan 10, 2018 6:30:00 AM

The importance of antibodies as tools in scientific research studies cannot be understated, yet these reagents have increasingly come under fire for their lack of reproducibility. Part of the issue is that the antibody market is composed of hundreds of vendors and resellers with varying definitions for validation and consistency. Cell Signaling Technology (CST) believes that antibody suppliers should be held accountable for the products they provide, but that vendors alone cannot solve the reproducibility “crisis." How antibodies are validated and used in the laboratory is a critical component to this process. Researchers need to be more attentive to following established protocols and leverage the expertise of the scientists who have developed and tested the product they are using. Journals need to be more active in enforcing existing policies regarding materials and methods or develop more clear-cut means to identify and describe the use of biological reagents in published research. During this webinar we will address the role vendors, researchers, and journals should play in minimizing irreproducibility. We will also outline CST’s antibody validation process, while highlighting steps all users should consider when selecting and using antibodies in their research.

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Topics: Antibody Performance, Antibody Validation, Webinars, Reproducibility

Reflecting on the New Year with Janus and Jak


Posted by Ken B on Jan 3, 2018 3:00:00 AM

With the arrival of the New Year, we all look back on 2017 and anticipate the coming year. CST scientists have been working hard to develop new antibodies and reagents to enable your next successful experiment in 2018!

In Roman mythology, the New Year and the month of January are associated with Janus, the god of transitions and doorways (1). Janus is best known for having two faces: one looking to the past, and one to the future. Janus also lends his name to the Janus kinase (Jak) family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases.

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Topics: Just for fun, Immunology

Happy Holidays from CST!


Posted by Chris S on Dec 27, 2017 12:02:01 PM

It's hard to believe that another year is almost over. We hope you're having a lovely holiday season with you and yours. We've been fairly busy closing another quarter. But it hasn't been all business. 'Tis the season for a little nonsense to fill us all with good cheer! We couldn't think of a better way than putting on some ugly sweaters and rocking the cafeteria.

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Topics: Just for fun

Webinar | Advances in AMPK and Autophagy Signaling


Posted by Liana G on Dec 20, 2017 6:15:00 AM

Reuben Shaw, Ph.D

Professor, Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Deputy Director, Salk Cancer Center, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

AMPK, a highly conserved sensor of cellular energy status, is found in all eukaryotic cells and maintains metabolic homeostasis by reprogramming growth, metabolism, and autophagy in the face of cellular stresses.

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Topics: Metabolism, Cell Biology

SfN 2017 Recap: Lonely Neuron No More


Posted by Richard C on Dec 13, 2017 3:10:00 AM

In Nov 2017, over 30,000 neuroscientists gathered in Washington D.C. to talk all things brain at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting. I’ve attended SfN for what is now on the order of decades. Having reluctantly accepted veteran status for the annual meeting, I thought this year’s SfN was an opportunity to consider where neuroscience has been, where it is, and where it’s going.

The research objectives at SfN — to understand how molecules, cells, and circuits drive complex behavior — are broad and overwhelming. Even today, I choke up recalling that inevitable question I’d get from my graduate school advisor after a meeting — what did you learn? Such a question is challenging for any meeting, and a strong perspective, particularly for SfN, is necessary to even consider it.

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Topics: Neuroscience, Alzheimer's Disease, Neurodegeneration

Immunotherapy: Empowering Nature’s Anti-Tumor Artillery - Part I


Posted by Liana G on Dec 6, 2017 6:15:00 AM

Immunotherapy as an anti-neoplastic strategy has gradually claimed the spotlight over the past several years. In fact, some now consider it as one of the pillars of cancer therapy along with chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and targeted therapy. Scientists and clinicians alike are cautiously optimistic, and point to response rates never seen before. 

And, why not take advantage of our own immune system and the best of its weaponry, the T cells, to fight cancer?

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Topics: Cancer Immunology, Journal Club

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