Journal Club | Zika virus turns off Akt signaling to hijack autophagy in developing neural tissue


Posted by Ken B on Mar 29, 2017 3:00:00 AM

The Zika virus (ZIKV) is related to flaviviruses that cause dengue and yellow fever, and is spread via mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus) bites and secondarily via sexual transmission. ZIKV infection in adults is associated with mild dengue-like disease or Guillain-Barré syndrome, an autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Most alarmingly, ZIKV is also transmitted across the placental barrier during pregnancy and can lead to the severe birth defect microencephaly (underdevelopment of the brain).

READ MORE >

Topics: Journal Club, Literature Review

CRISPR: Science magazine’s 2015 breakthrough of the year


Posted by Liana G on Jun 29, 2016 3:30:00 AM

CRISPR, a nifty gene-editing tool, has swept the scientific community off its feet. It has a catchy name, it’s in every other publication, it is the subject of a volatile legal dispute involving claims to its intellectual property (1), its use has instigated a multitude of summits to do with its ethical ramifications and, despite the fact that it’s less than 4 years old, the Science journal named it the ‘breakthrough of the year’ (2). To give you some perspective, the other contenders were the New Horizon’s epic visit to the dwarf planet Pluto, the discovery of a lymphatic system in the brain, and the Ebola vaccine. 

Well, you get the picture, CRISPR is a big deal, but what on Earth is it and why are scientists so smitten by it?

READ MORE >

Topics: Literature Review, Reproducibility

CRISPR: Science magazine’s 2015 breakthrough of the year


Posted by Liana G on Mar 2, 2016 3:00:00 AM

CRISPR, a nifty gene-editing tool, has swept the scientific community off its feet. It has a catchy name, it’s in every other publication, it is the subject of a volatile legal dispute involving claims to its intellectual property (1), its use has instigated a multitude of summits to do with its ethical ramifications and, despite the fact that it’s less than 4 years old, the Science journal named it the ‘breakthrough of the year’ (2). To give you some perspective, the other contenders were the New Horizon’s epic visit to the dwarf planet Pluto, the discovery of a lymphatic system in the brain, and the Ebola vaccine. 

Well, you get the picture, CRISPR is a big deal, but what on Earth is it and why are scientists so smitten by it?

READ MORE >

Topics: Literature Review