CST BLOG: Lab Expectations

The official blog of Cell Signaling Technology® (CST) where we discuss what to expect from your time at the bench, share tips, tricks, and information.

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Seeding Labs Gives Old Lab Equipment a Second Life

As stewards of the planet, we’re always trying to find ways to reduce our corporate carbon footprint and offset the environmental damage done through research. Operating a lab requires a lot of electricity: powering the freezers, microscopes, autostainers, and so much more. It all adds up. If you’re like us, you also want to find a way to give back, beyond the good that your research provides.

Partnering with Seeding Labs has given Cell Signaling Technology an opportunity to be ambassadors for the planet, for science, and for community.

 

 

When we replace or upgrade pieces of lab equipment, it makes sense to try and reuse or recycle wherever possible. The conventional avenues of disposal are often first to spring to mind. Should this be thrown away? Can it be recycled? In both instances however, we overlook one of the most important tenets to address our waste problem: reuse. Can another scientist use this? When we ask our friends at Seeding Labs if a retired piece of equipment can be used somewhere else, the answer is often an emphatic, “Yes!” Our retired lab gear has made its way to 37 universities in 21 different countries and counting. It’s a win-win-win. Scientists who may not have had access to these instruments are now empowered to take on something new.

We encourage you to take an active role in your own organization. Do you know what is happening to your equipment as it’s taken out of service? Consider partnering with Seeding Labs, or somehow making these tools available to young or underfunded scientists. To them, this equipment may be an upgrade to what’s been previously available.

You may have just the thing they need to make their next big discovery. Reach out to your lab operations partners to learn how to best reuse your devices.

Chris S
Chris S
Chris Sumner is the Editor-in-Chief of Lab Expectations. When he's not reading/writing about curing disease, he's hiking in the woods, playing guitar, or searching for the world's best lobster roll.

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